Book Launches Featured Work In the News Kiwi Writers Publication News SpecFicNZ 

Dunedin Author Kura Carpenter : The Kingfisher’s Debt (Urban Fantasy)

Dunedin author, Kura Carpenter’s Debut novel The Kingfisher’s Debt is available on preorder until the 10th August 2018 via publisher IFWG. The title will be on sale in Australia, UK and New Zealand on 28 September 2018.

The Kingfisher’s Debt is an Urban Fantasy set in Dunedin, New Zealand.

Magic isn’t real, right?

Within the small coastal city of Dunedin, local translator, Tamsin Fairchild has a reputation she hates. People think she’s psychic…

Always hovering around and interfering in Tamsin’s life, part father-figure, part thorn in her side, Detective Jackson, is an old-school cop. Childhood friend to her deceased mother, Tamsin wonders  could her mother have let an outsider in on the truth? | Read More...

Read More
Anthologies Kiwi Writers SpecFicNZ 

Te Kōrero Ahi Kā – Daniel Stride

Te Kōrero Ahi Kā – An Extract from the Diary of Peter Mackenzie

By Daniel Stride An Extract from the Diary of Peter Mackenzie (which originally had “with the permission of the Hocken Library” in the title!) was born out of a desire to write a monster story. Not just any monster story: I wanted something with a decidedly New Zealand flavour, which immediately suggested the involvement of a taniwha. The big issue then was deciding where (and when) to set the piece. I did a fair amount of research on the traditions of the Whanganui River for that purpose, until I stumbled upon a completely useless little bit of trivia: there were plans over a century ago to expand the (now-closed) Kurow Branch of the New Zealand Railways inland. Those plans came to nothing, and the Branch terminus remained at Hakataramea… which inspired my idea of using a Waitaki taniwha to “explain” this mysterious failure. Having a background in academic History (and old-school horror) did the rest, so you end up with editorial commentary, “permission” from the Hocken Library (I’m a Dunedinite), and the allusion to Seacliff Lunatic Asylum – itself a creepy little bit of Otago history that I might do something with at some point. There is also an historical in-joke in the form of the horse being named Sir John (it is up to the reader to decide if the reference to the legendary Minister of Lands is affectionate or mocking). I went with a diary format because I felt a comparatively archaic mode was a good fit for the late nineteenth century, a time period not quite alien in its psychology, yet not quite modern. And it’s a horror story, damn it: a diary – the literary equivalent of a found-footage film – is a perfect way of covering a doomed protagonist. After that, the story rather wrote itself.
Read More